Cultural Autumn in Prague

Are you wondering whether autumn is the right time to visit Prague? Well, if you are into culture, the answer is a definite yes as there are many significant cultural events taking place in Prague before the winter starts. In this period, you will have a hard time choosing from the wide range of theatres, festivals, exhibitions, concerts, balls and other social events. Moreover, you will not have to make you way through crowds of people running after Christmas presents. And this year, the forecasters are predicting a sunny Indian summer.

CZECH PRESS PHOTO

The world around us never stops changing. We cannot possibly witness all the important moments and visit all the interesting sites on our planet. However, we can still discover and experience them through the prestigious photo competition CZECH PRESS PHOTO. The competing photos are divided into eight categories, including Daily life, Portrait, People in the news or Humans and the environment. The competition includes only photographs taken by Czech and Slovak authors. The photographs from the competition will be exhibited at the Old Town Hall’s Cloisters and Knight’s Hall from 23 November 2019 until the end of January 2020.

 

Strings of Autumn

The Strings of Autumn Festival is one of the youngest music projects in Prague. So what is it about? Let us employ a metaphor of a multiple-course meal served from 15 October until 13 November at various unconventional venues in the centre of Prague. The aperitif will be the performance of British singer and pianist Laura Mvula, followed by the main course served by saxophone player Charles Lloyd, jazz pianist Fred Hersch or the avant-garde group Jack Quartet. This year’s dessert will be prepared by the legendary hip-hop group De La Soul. The menu also includes another mini-festival “Strings in Film”, presenting film music of composers and musicians associated with Strings of Autumn. You make look forward to personalities such as Miles Davis, Bobby McFerrin, Phillip Glass and many others.

MARTIN’S GOOSE

Last but not least, do not forget to taste the famous St. Marin’s roast goose served with dumplings and sauerkraut. On St. Martin’s Day (11 November), you will find it in the menu of all Prague restaurants as the medieval tradition of dancing, hunting, pig-slaughtering and feasting on St. Martin’s Day is still very much alive today.

Little Quiz For Tourists With A Capital T

We have a little quiz for all tourists with a capital T. Every place, all the more so every capital city, has its distinctive character – let’s say a legend of its own. Not to worry – what follows is not a test of your knowledge of the history or geography of the Czech Republic. We would like to share with you the absolute “musts” in the Czech Republic: the must-visits, must-sees, must-hears and, of course, the must-tastes. Each of us has their own specific idea when it comes to the symbols of this city in the heart of Europe, so you might as well consider this an invitation for discussion. Here is our list of 3 characteristic features of Prague and the Czech Republic that you should definitely include in your travel itinerary. We welcome your suggestions, ideas and additions to our list if you feel that we have left anything out.

BEER

We could not possibly name anything else as the absolute number one. Czech beer is simply something of a national institution. Just like the Italians have their pizza, the French their champagne, Czechs are famous for their beer. It is unique in that it is brewed using traditional Czech recipes and technological methods and high-quality ingredients. Czech beer is best known for its rich colour, full taste, savoury bitterness and hoppy smell. We are talking about a true national treasure – Czech Pilsner, also called Pils or Pilsener (Plzeň in Czech). The term Pilsner-type beer is used for pale, bottom-fermented lager brewed according to a recipe originally from the city of Pilsen. It has a much richer hoppy taste compared to other lagers. This beer should always be poured down the edges of the beer mug in one go, so that it has a nice big head.

photo credits: https://www.tiqets.com/en/

Do not miss out on the flawlessly tapped beer in the Restaurant U Fleků – they are real beer masters as they have been doing this since 1499!

COMMUNISM

Communism had characterised this country from 1948, when the communist party took power in Czechoslovakia, establishing a totalitarian regime. These dark times when Czechoslovakia formed a part of the Eastern Bloc came to an end in 1989 with the Velvet Revolution. We recommend visiting the Museum of Communism, where you will discover the communist era from various perspectives, including everyday life under the communist rule.

photo credits: https://hlidacipes.org/

KAFKA

Franz Kafka might be the most famous native of Prague and he is definitely one of the most influential 20th-century writers. Kafka lived in Prague his entire life and loved this city dearly – after all, you might often hear the term “Kafka’s Prague” in this context.

The story of Kafka’s manuscripts is well-known – being a perfectionist, Kafka published only a small part of his writings during his life. When his health began to deteriorate, he asked his friends to destroy all of his unpublished texts, notes, journals and letters. Kafka’s partner fulfilled his wishes and indeed burnt all of the documents she had. That was not the case for Kafka’s best friend, who decided otherwise and thus preserved a large part of his work for future generations. He believed that Kafka was a genius and – as we all know now – he was more than right as Kafka’s novels and short stories became some of the most important sources of modern literature in the world. Visit the Franz Kafka Museum in Prague and learn more about this intriguing writer.

Are there any other symbols of Prague and the Czech Republic that come to your mind? We are looking forward to your comments, ideas, experiences and suggestions.

Hot summer in Prague

Most of us are excited about the arrival of summer. We count down the days until the cold and grey days without sunshine are over. Sounds familiar? You wake up in the morning but the sun is nowhere in sight, only lazily breaking the dawn. Then, the long-awaited summer arrives and the sun finally rises earlier than you do. And perhaps you start wishing that the daylight would come just a little bit later…  And then it is all over again.

If you are planning a summer trip to Prague and you are in that stage when you would welcome the sun taking more time to wake up, you will definitely appreciate these few tips on where to hide from the burning heat and cool down for a bit.

There are several hidden spots not far from Prague where you can take a swim, go for a pleasant walk or enjoy a picnic in the shade.

Kosov Quarry

As this is a flooded former quarry, you will by no means feel as Mr or Mrs Chlorine after taking a dip in the crystal turquoise water. The quarry is big enough for everyone to swim comfortably without bumping into other people all the time. Access to water is a bit tricky but do not let this discourage you from the visit as there are many spots on the shore where you will have no problem getting in. The quarry has been abandoned and of course there is no mining going on but swimming there is still at your own risk. Apart from people looking for recreation, it is also a popular destination for palaeontologists and environmentalists. You can see the bottom of the lake through the crystal clear water, which is home to various species of fish, water plants and crayfish. As we all know, crayfish are a sign of clean water. This spot is simply a perfect one-day hideaway in hot days. If you are in the mood for a swim in clean cool water and a bit of an adventure, the Kosov Quarry is the place to go (“Lom Kosov” in Czech). Our tip: take your food and drinks with you since unspoilt nature kind of excludes the presence of snack bars.

Průhonice Dendrological Garden

Have you ever dreamt of a place where you could go with your loved one on a hot sunny day and enjoy a romantic picnic in the shade of a tree by a small lake, surrounded by fragrant flowers? A place where you would have privacy without having to look at another couple’s lunch? Or perhaps you are wondering whether there is a place where you could let your children play outside but still see them all the time? Or maybe a place you could visit with your friends and take a walk while having a pleasant chat, followed by a cold beer in the shade of a tree? If your answer to any of these questions was yes, then we recommend going to the Dendrological Garden in Průhonice. It covers the area of 72.8 hectares and offers nearly 8,000 species of plants. You may admire – and smell – the most beautiful collections of rhododendrons, ornamental apple trees, lilacs or spireas in the Czech Republic. You will also find beautiful climbing roses, old rose species and rose bushes as well as various pine trees and spruces in the park. It is a true paradise if you want to escape from the hustle and bustle of the centre of Prague but, at the same time you, you do not want to travel far away. On top of that, you can expand your knowledge of botany as each plant is marked by its Latin name.

photo credits: https://dendrologickazahrada.cz/

Mlékojedy Beach Park

The beach park opens in mid-May and welcomes visitors throughout the whole summer. It is located on the shore of a flooded sand quarry in Mlékojedy, a tiny village near Neratovice less than 40 km from Prague. It is a great place for swimming, where you can also play beach volleyball or football and try out a climbing wall or let your kids have fun on the playground. There are many different events organised every night, including live concerts, DJs, film screenings, workshops, sports events and much more. You can sleep in a tent but there is a real possibility that all the great music will not let you close your eyes and you will simply dance all night long. Four-legged companions are welcome. Come and enjoy a party, awesome music and sports activities with your friends – all in one place!

photo credits: http://www.beachparkmlekojedy.cz/

Family Holiday in Prague

Everybody has their own idea of the perfect family holiday. These ideas might differ even within the family itself. Children usually prefer a place, where they can play and have fun all day long and – more importantly – get away from their parents for a while. Mums might dream of a place where they do not have to cook, will get a good night’s sleep, relax, maybe get a suntan and perhaps get away from their kids for some time. And most dads want to go to a place where they can watch sports events, enjoy great food and get away from everyone, just for a while. J Did we get it right…?

Before you take your family to Prague, read our holiday tips that will make everyone happy!

Mirror Maze

Have you ever imagined yourself giant-like, dwarf-like, Edward Scissorhands-like, Pinocchio-like or any other “-like”? Your kids will howl with laughter, and you will too! The Mirror Maze is indeed the place to go if you want an afternoon filled with laughing. From the outside, the maze looks like a castle and once you step in, you will get lost in endless corridors with mirror walls. Lost sight of your kid? And what is that long-nosed thing laughing its head off in the distance? Yes, you are right, that is your child… But wait, there are more! An only child turning into triplets? Everything is possible here. See for yourself what your family look would like in all shapes and sizes. But beware! Some keep their long noses even after leaving the maze…

 

Strahov Library

Adding an educational interlude into your holiday itinerary might be a source of dispute. However, the unique Strahov Library is both a feast for the eyes and a historical gem. It is a part of the Strahov Monastery, the oldest Premonstratensian monastery in Bohemia, founded in 1140. There are about 200,000 volumes in total in the library, including more than 3,000 manuscripts and 1,500 incunabula. The library offers a truly magical atmosphere. You can literarily feel the history breathing down your neck back with all these books and fascinating frescoes on the ceiling. Definitely something you do not want to miss on your visit.

Letní Letná

It is no easy task to describe this event, taking place in the last two weeks of August in the beautiful park Letná in Prague 7, in a few sentences. Let’s say it is a festival of new circus, acrobatics, music, dance, theatre, pantomime, fine arts, games and laughter. You can see all kinds of performances, listen to music or visit art workshops at night as well as during the day. There are also special performances for children, toys are available directly in the park and you might bump into clowns and jugglers. Naturally, you can enjoy all of this with great food and drinks. Each member of your family will find what they are looking for. Come and see for yourself at this year’s 15th edition of this exceptional festival from 14 August until 1st September.

Bakeries in Prague

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker’s man,
Bake me a cake, as fast as you can;
Pat it, prick it, and mark it with B,
Put it in the oven for baby and me.

Remember kindergarten? Well, in the following bakeries, they definitely do not make cakes as fast as they can, but as best as they can.

With the arrival of spring, we are all looking forward to picnics in the parks of Prague. And there is no picnic without good bread and pastry, right? So where to grab the best bite to eat out in the sun?

From the long list of cafés, sweet shops, snack bars, bistros, delis and patisseries, we chose three very different bakeries definitely worth a visit during your stay in Prague.

In all of them, you will witness a play co-starring quality and passion for baking. Their owners prepare their baked goods themselves, so you can feast on fresh pastries directly from the oven.

NAŠE TOUSTÁRNA   

Forget about shelves full of toasts and sandwiches of various shapes in “Our Toast Bar”. Goods baked in this toast bar, including delicious bread, buns or the local speciality – sweet “drawers“ – are all toast-like, at least in their shape. If you don’t see your favourite combination right away, no need to worry, the staff will prepare a special toast with only the ingredients of your choice.

We would definitely recommend the sweet “drawers” available in many different seasonal variants: chocolate, rhubarb, apple, raspberry, strawberry, blueberry, cherry, banana, poppy, coconut, pear…

Address: Dělnická 1565/56, 170 00 Prague 7

ARCTIC BAKEHOUSE

Arctic? Frozen? Cold? Shake off the shivers and visit the bakery Arctic Bakehouse, run by two enthusiastic Icelanders who decided to bake Nordic specialities in Prague. Any particular reason why in Prague, you ask? Cherchez la femme, as the French say… Despite the bakery’s name, both men sweat every day to make everything ready as each piece of bread goes through their hands. They are no newbies as they have been in the business for 25 years, so they really know their stuff.

We recommend the sweet fried cinnamon or vanilla snails. But consume responsibly, cases of addiction have been reported.

Address: Újezd 11, 150 00 Malá Strana

PRAKTIKA

Czechs are known for feeling very strongly about their bread. If you ask Czech expats what they miss the most from their homeland, they will often answer bread. They might as well say bread from Praktika. Made from stone ground flour, slowly proved from sourdough and highly hydrated, local bread is truly unique.

We recommend tasting the wheat and rye bread. However, there’s a real danger that no other bread will ever be good enough for you again, so at your own risk!

Address: Bělehradská 66/990, Prague 2, 12000

Top 3 lookout points in Prague from a local’s point of view

Planning a trip to Prague, the City of a Hundred Spires and capital of a small country in the heart of Europe? Are you one of those thoroughly prepared tourists who make a detailed itinerary ahead of their journey and follow it closely during their holiday? Or rather are you one of those travellers who also plan their programme beforehand but then let themselves be carried away by chance?

Whether you belong to either of these groups, I believe that the following tips might come in handy.

I consider myself to be somewhere in between these two categories. I like to read about places of interest in the given destination and other travellers’ recommendations before the journey but once there, I also enjoy discovering interesting places by chance and with the help of the locals.

Being a Praguer born and bred, I would like to share with you the must-see lookout points in our beautiful city.

Vyšehrad Castle

Vyšehrad castle surrounded by medieval ramparts owes its charm not only to its location, being built directly on a rock overlooking the Vltava River, but also to its intriguing history, playing a key role in several Czech legends.

Vyšehrad is a must-see and a walk along the castle walls offers breathtaking views of the city and the river. You might even be lured by one of the boats in the small port bellow and let yourself be carried away on water.

The best time for a visit is just after lunch, when the sun is shining high – just find a comfy spot on the ramparts and savour the view of the sparkling river snaking through the city.

Prague Metronome

The metronome located in the park Letenské sady – a green oasis and a perfect summer chill-out place for all age categories – is also called the Pendulum or Stalin. It replaced Stalin’s memorial from the communist era, which might be the principal reason why the Pendulum has become a popular venue for music shows, theatre performances and other cultural events organised by independent artists.

It is a truly magical place, with an exceptional view of the whole of Prague – seriously – you can see the Old Town, Charles Bridge, National Theatre, Petřín, Žižkov TV Tower as well as all the other Prague towers and spires.

Our recommendation: plan your trip after the sunset. The entire city with all the lights on will lie open before you – a genuinely inspirational experience is guaranteed.

Riegrovy sady Park

The park located in the very heart of Žižkov, a part of Prague 3, also known as the “most rebellious” Prague quarter is the perfect place to chill out for a bit in a beer garden and watch the sunset.

The best view is from the meadow next to the popular beer garden and the main access path with benches. The meadow is on a moderate hill, so you will feel as in a cinema, where the film is produced by nature itself. This view of the hundred-spired Prague bathed in the sun is simply breathtaking.

In summer, there is no need to leave after the end of the show as the park turns into a lively festival of people sitting on blankets and enjoying a picnic or a refreshing drink.

Old Town Bridge Tower

You have already explored Prague through and through, gone to most Prague city tours, seen all the main historical sites including the mesmerizing view from Prague Castle, experienced the touching atmosphere of the St. Vitus Cathedral and strolled through the romantic narrow streets of Prague Venice and the Old Town… Do you still maintain the foolish view the media have been claiming for so long – namely that Paris that is the most romantic city?

Then you must have missed the sunrise or sunset from the top of one of Europe’s most beautiful medieval Gothic buildings – the Old Town Bridge Tower!

8_of_10_-_Charles_Bridge,_PRAGUE

The Old Town Bridge Tower dates back to the reign of the famous king Charles IV in the 14th century (who allegedly designed a part of the tower himself). In my opinion, it belongs to the 10 top things to do in Prague. After a nice breakfast or dinner in one of Old Town’s pleasant restaurants or cafes (please try to be moderate with the beer this time!) and a lovely walk towards Charles Bridge, with the warm spring breeze blowing away all the smog while bringing the nice river smell and the dim light gradually giving way to the sunset, take the hand of your loved one, forget about the improper comment they made about your hair the day before and simply say a couple of nice words to create the right atmosphere. Arriving at the entrance to Charles Bridge, don’t blindly follow the unknowing crowd hurrying towards the bridge but instead, turn left to the monumental Old Town Bridge Tower. Climb to the first floor to watch an amusing cartoon about the history of Charles Bridge and then continue to the very top (for a small of fee of about 90 crowns).

Prague_-_Old_Town_Bridge_Tower

If there is anything you have been long afraid to ask your better half, now is the right time! If not, just enjoy the romance and the panoramic view of practically the whole historical heart of Prague. But also remember the 21 protesters against the Catholic Church beheaded on the Old Town Square in 1621. There are 21 white crosses on the pavement in front of the Old Town Hall in memory of the tragedy. Twelve of them had the unique opportunity to enjoy the view of Charles Bridge from the Old Town Bridge Tower for almost 10 years (imagine the smell!). If this is still not romantic enough, remember all the “criminals” (who committed petty thefts or simply had a bad face expression when in the company of a wealthy person, which was a crime serious enough) and “witches” subjected to proving their innocence in this place. Just opposite the Jesus Christ statue right below, those people were put into a small tub and thrown into the water. The tub was lifted out after ten minutes and if the person survived, they were vindicated. Indeed, life in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, just like in most medieval societies, was harmonious and the rule was just.

View of the Powder Tower. Prague. Czech Republic, Western Europe. October 23, 2012

But do not get carried away! Disregarding the magical view and the fascinating history of this place, keep in mind the opening hours (from 10 am till 10 pm in the summer season). So don’t miss on one of the best tourist attractions in Prague!

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We wish you a nice stay in Prague full of romance!

Veg/Veggie/Vegan/Vegetarian

Was one of your New Year’s resolutions to cut out meat? Are you feeling sad for all the animals being killed just because of pleasure on your plate? This month I will show where to feast meat-free (and animal by-product free) and not just because of Lent.

My favorite place is called Pastva restaurant&café, probably because it’s located right in front of my house. They have unique daily menus, consisting of a choice of three meals and a soup. The food I ate there was always delicious and full of new tastes. Price range is also very friendly and as a plus, they also have delicious organic lemonades. The place is quite small, so it can be difficult to find a seat during lunch hour, especially when you are a bigger group of people, but it is really worth waiting a while for a table.

photo / www.pastva-restaurant.cz
photo / www.pastva-restaurant.cz

If you are in the city centre desperately looking for something nutritious and all you see around are fast foods, look no further! There is a chain of vegan and vegetarian restaurants called Loving hut and Dhaba beas, respectively. In terms of taste, you could find better spots, but if you are vegan you can eat fine there for nice price, right in the city centre. If I were you I would mark those restaurant spots on your map, to always know where the nearest is. They often serve food as a buffet, so you can pick just the stuff you like. The best part: free water, no paying extra for still drinks!

photo / www.beas-dhaba.cz
photo / www.beas-dhaba.cz

Now moving on to hipster town: Have you heard of Krymská Street? No? Krymská is the most hip street Prague (it’s common knowledge, no one knows why).  And what kind of a hip street would it be without a vegan restaurant? Plevel restaurant has even been awarded an exceptional star from one of the most famous Czech chefs, Zdeněk Pohlreich. Their speciality is fruit/veg smoothies and also innovate every day, with unique daily menus.

photo / http://restauraceplevel.cz
photo / http://restauraceplevel.cz

Now for the Sun of all stars: Etnosvět.
This restaurant gem is pricier than most of the restaurants that I previously mentioned. I strongly recommend having a reservation as the restaurant is quite small, and frequently filled. This place is also family friendly, so an ideal location for a celebration. Their menu is a fusion of the world’s most famous cuisines and the best meal I had there so far was their creamy Thai curry. It is not on their current menu, but maybe you’ll luck out and find it on one of their their daily menus.

photo / http://etnosvet.cz/en
photo / http://etnosvet.cz/en

Do not fancy beer? Here are your options…

This time we will go against the flow. The Czech Republic may be well known as a country of beer, but a lot of people do appreciate a good glass of wine. Moravia, the part of the Czech Republic that is almost never visited by any tourists (as most of the parts outside Prague), produces quite a lot of wine for the size of our country.

Firstly, I would like to give you some basic tips, in case you just want to buy a bottle in a supermarket. You can buy some very cheap wines that are often surprisingly good (around 100 CZK per bottle), BUT that does not apply to Czech wine! The usual price range for good foreign wines is around 100-300 CZK. Most of the more expensive bottles are overpriced  as the quality doesn’t increase much. On the other hand, cheap Czech wines are not drinkable. Generally,  if you prefer to go local, go for white wine or rosé.  The country doesn’t have enough sunlight for producing quality red wines and thus many reds often contain added sugar, which may cause headaches. To my knowledge, the price range for good Czech wine is 200-400 CZK.

wine-890370_1920

Don’t know where to go to enjoy a nice glass or two or three? If you want great wine with your lunch, try Kavárna ad Astra. They have the best table wine I have ever tasted  offered  for an incredibly low price (less than 50 CZK for a glass). As it is a French style café,  their menu mostly consists of crépes and galettes, but during lunchtime, you can also get a typical Czech meal.

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photo / fb @cafeAdAstra

Right around the corner from ad Astra, there is one of my favorite wineries to stop by in the summer, Na břehu Rhony. You can choose from a wide selection of lovely wines to pour yourself straight from the shelf or opt for a bottle for a romantic evening with your loved one. The staff is always very helpful and in case you are indecisive like myself, they will help you pick the wine that will best suit your taste or you can go all in and try as many as you can. You can admire the Provence-style interior or sit outside and enjoy the atmosphere of Náplavka. Soak in the rays of sun as it sets over the stunning Prague castle panorama by continuing to one of the Prague boat tours on the Vltava river.

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photo / fb Pas à pas, s.r.o. – Víno s tělem i duší

The last place that I mention should for sure end up the last on your list. It is the elegant  Monarch Gastrobar. This newly renovated wine bar allows you to discover the marvelous tastes of liquid grapes and comes with a range of great tapas to choose from. I especially recommend their patés and cheeses. They are the kind that you could eat all the time and still ask for more! Another great feature is that the bar is located right next to Národní třída area, which is the go to place for most of Prague’s young and hip.

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photo / fb @MonarchGastrobar

Prague From Stalin’s Viewpoint

You may have come across a beautiful postcard or an amazing Photoshopped picture of Prague that made you wonder where the heck the picture could have been taken?! You comfort yourself with the idea that the photographer must have suffered a lot and surely walked miles before getting to this distant secret place, or even worse, must have gone on some kind of dreary walking tour of Prague! 

letná 2
photo credits: http://poprve.blogspot.cz

However, things that seem distant and unreachable are often closer and more accessible than we think. In fact, one of the most beautiful and popular parks in Prague – Letná – is only a short ride from the city centre! You can take tram no. 15 from “Náměstí republiky” (the square with two shopping centres, the Municipal House and the Powder Tower) or tram no. 17 from “Právnická fakulta” (Faculty of Law at the riverbank at the end of the famous “Pařížská ulice” (Paris Street) full of luxury boutiques). Either way, you will get to the stop “Čechův most” in no time and then you just have to climb up the stairs.

Praha,_Holešovice,_zimní_Letná,_schodiště_k_Čechovu_mostu_II

Still having trouble finding this place? Don’t worry, the people of Prague have gone to great lengths to make it clearly visible from far away… Just look for a huge ticking triangular thing right next to the Vltava River. By now, some of you might be asking yourselves who in their right mind would build a giant metronome in the middle of a city? To satisfy your curiosity, we must look back at a chapter of Czech history, which is not a particularly happy one to recall for most Czechs.

Praha,_Holešovice,_zimní_Letná

In 1948, the Soviet Union decided that the freedom celebration party in Czechoslovakia after the Second World War had been going on for far too long, so we became a communist country. As peoples’ hearts were being injected with communist ideals, the park in Letná suddenly started feeling too empty. The Czechs were forced to show their gratitude to their Soviet liberators (just like we are grateful to our boss for letting us work overtime, thus liberating us from the chains of laziness…) and the empty Letná Park was the perfect place. As a result, since 1955 no tourists (if there were any), however bad their sense of direction was and even without a tourist map of Prague, could have possibly missed this place. There was a huge statue of Stalin, enjoying a beautiful view of Prague from the top of the Letná Park (while everyone else worked in factories). It was the biggest statue in the whole of Europe at the time (no wonder the architects committed suicide before it was officially revealed, probably due to exhaustion). What is interesting (and a bit upsetting for some) is that some of the stone used for the statue was taken from sites playing a significant role in the history of our nation (e.g. the Old Town Hall, our national hill Říp or from village Ležáky, annihilated by the Nazis along with Lidice).

Letna-park._Európa_legnagyobb,_30_méteres_Sztálin_szobra_volt_(állt_1962-ig)._Ma_egy_25_méteres,_működő_metronóm_van_a_helyén._Fortepan_7365

Fortunately (for us), Stalin’s supporters didn’t enjoy this magnificent statue for long (those who miss it can buy Chinese Pu-erh tea with a picture of Stalin and Mao Zedong in one of the many Prague tea shops).  When Khrushchev took power, he openly criticized Stalin’s cult of personality and the statue was taken down (narcissism never gets fully appreciated…). After the fall of communism in 1989, when the hearts of people were being filled with money for a change, the Letná Park seemed a bit empty again.  The Metronome Monument was built at exactly the same spot where Stalin’s statue used to stand. The rationale was to remind us that times can change and to warn us against repeating the mistakes of the past (anyway, there is no need for that today, since dry river beds, infertile soil and climate change can do the job very well on their own).

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So come and enjoy the view Stalin once had and see our beautiful city of Prague from a different angle. Since there are several playgrounds in the park, it is one of the things to do in Prague with kids. And don’t forget to learn from your past mistakes (especially don’t make the mistake of not having an awesome once-in-a-lifetime Prague holiday)!